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Living in the United States has been one of the best moments of my life. Not only did I learn a lot about life, I've had the opportunity to meet people I never thought would cross my path, people I've admired from afar and people I didn't even know existed and who had a phenomenal impact on my life and I'll never be able to thank each and every person who touched my life even in the smallest way. Though I adore my US experience, reminiscing about my home always tugged my heartstrings, and found myself looking forward to the time when I would finally touch down on familiar soil once again. I felt an overwhelming feeling of anxiety when I felt the wheels tuck into the plane and I watched United States of America's topography get smaller and smaller. The 32-hour-long flight was a rollercoaster of emotions, saying goodbye to a place I called home, to friends I may never see again and the families I spent holidays festivities with. But when I saw the snow-peak mountains th...

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Back in 2014, I decided to join TFN and volunteer as a Fellow in a public school in remote areas teaching children for two years. It was not a difficult decision, given the fact that I had received a good education because of support I received from my family. Good education provided me with many choices; Living in Kathmandu close to my family, working in an organization of my choice, go abroad, or just do anything that pleased me. But I chose to teach in a public school in a remote area of Lalitpur for two years because I believed that I could make a difference in the lives of hundreds of children by providing them with a good education. The placement school I taught was 60 km (less than 40 Miles) away from Kathmandu but was a day long drive. Since the village was at the top of the mountain, water was scarce. Other daily supplies need had to be carried on the back of a person. Since not many young people live in the village, it is often older children who carry them. ...

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My name is Jigme Sherpa. I am the tenth child in my family. I grew up with number of people whom I could look up to. My parents were originally from Sindhupalchowk. But, I was raised in Kathmandu.  When I was 16, I visited Sindhupalchowk for the first time. That’s when I realized how lucky and privileged I was to have been raised in Kathmandu. When in the village, I saw that my cousin had to walk for hours just to attend school.   Even then the quality of the school was much lower than what I had received at a private school in Kathmandu. I had seen that just for the fact of a birth – whether in Kathmandu or in a village changed destiny of a person. I wanted to change the destiny. Therefore, when I completed my Bachelor's degree, I chose to join Fellowship of Teach for Nepal and teach in a rural community of Sindhupalchowk for 2 years. Two years came with many ups and downs, including surviving through the 2015 Earthquake. But, ultim...

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Education is a powerful driver of development and one of the strongest instruments for reducing poverty and improving health, gender equality, peace, and stability. Yet, even though there has been great progress in the last decade, some 121 million children are still out of primary and lower secondary school, and 250 million children cannot read or write. Ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education had become one of my goals in life. I take each and every action with a full realization that my work now means that children in under-privileged context can be able to fulfill their potential. You can change the reality of many children in Nepal by donating. Your money will pay for quality education for children that live in the most marginalized communities in Nepal.

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At 85 KG (187 Pounds) I can barely make through three flights of stairs without a break. In three weeks, I am starting a 12 day trek through highest Himalayas to the over 17,500 feet at Mount Everest Base Camp. This, I know is a challenge. But this is nothing compared to the challenge that Teach For Nepal Fellows and the students go through. In schools where we work, students often walk 2-3 hours daily through the rough terrain. They start early and arrive home late. Waking up every day at the crack of dawn, they support their families with household work, grab some quick meal, and start on a trek to school. When they arrive at the school, there is no guarantee that they will receive the best possible education. Only 10 out of 100 students who start school, at grade 1, in Nepal are eventually likely to complete secondary school. But, Teach For Nepal Fellows are changing this reality. Over the last three years, we have increased school graduation rate by 100% and over ...

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"TFN House"
140 Chitra Marga, Kantipath
Jamal, Kathmandu, Nepal

+977-1-4240105

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